New Pages #updates #woodworking #troubleshoot

It’s been a while since I’ve updated the website, I’ve been a little busy but I hope to include more frequent updates from here on out.

Anyways her are two new pages added to the site. The first is a woodworking project where I designed an entertainment center for a couple friends. The other is the start of a new section on how to troubleshoot and it can be found in the tutorials section. Enjoy.

Entertainment Center

Troubleshooting Connectors

DIY: Nuclear Fusor #diy

There’s a nice tutorial on Makezine.com on how to create your very own Nuclear Fusor. Of course there are some harmful elements to this project and I don’t think you’ll get as much power out of it than you would initially think, but it’s a very cool to show off to your friends. Below is a brief description of it’s operation.

The typical Farnsworth-Hirsch fusor has two concentric electrical grids inside a vacuum chamber: an inner grid charged to a high negative potential, and an outer grid held at ground potential. Our benchtop version has a stainless steel wire inner grid, and uses the aluminum chamber walls as the outer grid.

A variac controls the AC mains voltage input to a neon sign transformer, which steps up standard 110V AC to the 10kV range. A homemade rectifier converts AC to DC power to charge the grid.

A vacuum pump evacuates the chamber to a pressure of about 0.025mm of mercury, clearing the playing field so the few remaining gas molecules can accelerate without premature low-energy collisions. A vacuum gauge indicates the pressure inside.

High voltage across the grids causes gas molecules to ionize; that is, they lose an electron and become positively charged. Electrostatic forces then accelerate the ions — mainly O2+, N2+, Ar+, and H2O+ — toward the high negative charge at the center. Some ions collide; those that miss the first time are arrested by the electric field and re-accelerated toward the center for another go.

New Project: DIY air-conditioning unit #Instructables

IMG_9163

This was a common project that I originally found on Instructables. When I finally put it together the results weren’t quite what I wanted so I’m adding a little bit of an electronics spin to it. I’ve picked up some peltiers’ and heat sinks off Ebay for a good deal and will be developing a control unit for this project that I can hopefully control from the internet. This project page will be updated as I progress through this project. This is an open source project, of course, and all project files will be made available to you. Enjoy.

DIY Solder Mask for your homemade PCBs #DIY #Soldermask

I’ve been looking for something like this for a while. Enjoy.

This Instructable is about dry film solder mask, in other words, is the green stuff that is on top of the circuit board.
I like to use smd components in my circuits board because I don’t have a computerized drill machine and do in it by hand for a big
boards are really tedious.

Soldering smd components in a copper board without dry solder mask, especially for those little capacitors and resistor of 402 in size, becomes a tough challenge and of course those micro controllers with almost zero space between pins.

Read more here

Guides: Grounding Principles

In a previous blog on supply bypassing, I cautioned that poor bypassing could increase distortion of an amplifier. A reader, Walter, asked an interesting question… where should you connect the ground of a bypass capacitor to avoid problems?

This raises questions regarding proper grounding techniques. Wow. Big topic, but I may be able provide some insight with a couple of simple examples.

Figure 1 shows inverting and non-inverting amplifier stages with unintended, parasitic resistance or inductance in the ground connections (highlighted in red). The nodes A, B and C are all intended to be ground. But if current flows in parasitic ground impedances, these nodes will not be at the same potential. It is these parasitic ground impedances that can allow distorted ground currents to contaminate signals.

 

Read more at Texas Instruments

24VAC to 5VDC Conversion

Ray Wang wrote this post about voltage conversion from 24VAC to 5VDC.

Voltage conversion from 24VAC to 5VDC is quite useful, because a lot of home automation devices use 24VAC, including sprinkler solenoids, home surveillance systems etc. Having a conversion module makes it easy to use a single power supply, without a separate 5V adapter for your control circuit. There are plenty of resources you can find online about it. But these resources are rather scattered. So in this blog post I summarize and discuss the common choices.

Find more information at RaysHobby.

DIY Wireless Data Transceiver

Wireless Data Transceiver

From Electronic-Lab.com

Have you ever wanted to send data from a sensor or project wirelessly? This simplecircuit allows you to build your own wireless transceiver using two ICs, a transistor, and two resistors. The IC is from Melexis and uses On-Off Keying modulation and can be battery powered.