New Pages #updates #woodworking #troubleshoot

It’s been a while since I’ve updated the website, I’ve been a little busy but I hope to include more frequent updates from here on out.

Anyways her are two new pages added to the site. The first is a woodworking project where I designed an entertainment center for a couple friends. The other is the start of a new section on how to troubleshoot and it can be found in the tutorials section. Enjoy.

Entertainment Center

Troubleshooting Connectors

Printrbot Jr V2: New Aluminum Extruder, Reference #Printrbot

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I’ve had the Printrbot Jr V2 for several months now and have had lots of issues with the original extruder design. So when I saw the new aluminum extruder, it was sold. I had a couple issues with it initially. The biggest being that there was no guide to show you how to put it together. Nor were there any reference pictures to tell me whether I did it right or not.

I’ve taken the liberty of creating a little guide to help anyone else looking to purchase and assemble the new Aluminum Extruder.

Take a look HERE

MIT Morphing Table #mit

I can’t quite remember which movie I saw something like this on, but it sure is cool to see something real. What intrigues me most is how quickly the table responds. Looking through the paper it looks like they use electromagnets to actuate the individual blocks. Overall a cool project. I’m interested to see how it will evolve.

If you’re interested you can find the project details here.

DIY: Nuclear Fusor #diy

There’s a nice tutorial on Makezine.com on how to create your very own Nuclear Fusor. Of course there are some harmful elements to this project and I don’t think you’ll get as much power out of it than you would initially think, but it’s a very cool to show off to your friends. Below is a brief description of it’s operation.

The typical Farnsworth-Hirsch fusor has two concentric electrical grids inside a vacuum chamber: an inner grid charged to a high negative potential, and an outer grid held at ground potential. Our benchtop version has a stainless steel wire inner grid, and uses the aluminum chamber walls as the outer grid.

A variac controls the AC mains voltage input to a neon sign transformer, which steps up standard 110V AC to the 10kV range. A homemade rectifier converts AC to DC power to charge the grid.

A vacuum pump evacuates the chamber to a pressure of about 0.025mm of mercury, clearing the playing field so the few remaining gas molecules can accelerate without premature low-energy collisions. A vacuum gauge indicates the pressure inside.

High voltage across the grids causes gas molecules to ionize; that is, they lose an electron and become positively charged. Electrostatic forces then accelerate the ions — mainly O2+, N2+, Ar+, and H2O+ — toward the high negative charge at the center. Some ions collide; those that miss the first time are arrested by the electric field and re-accelerated toward the center for another go.

Open-Source Robotics: Poppy Project #poppyproject

A new opensource robotics project is releasing in France called the Poppy Project.

Poppy is an Open-source humanoid platform based on robust, flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software.
Designed by the Flowers Lab at Inria Bordeaux and Ensta ParisTech (France), its development aims at providing an affordable and hackable humanoid robot for science, education, art and geeks.
Poppy was initially made for our research project about understanding biped locomotion, and full-body physical and social interaction in robots and humans.

Electronics-Lab announces PCB giveaway #FreePCB

Electronics-lab.com is offering to manufacture 5 pcbs for your project for free. All you have to do is place your opensource project in their project section. Course there are some rules that you need to follow. If you’re interested more information can be found on their site HERE.